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iFLY Virtual Education Program

Paper Airplane Lab (Elementary) Standards Alignment

 

Learning Objectives

Standard

  • Create a paper airplane utilizing the 5-step engineering design process: ask, imagine, plan, create and improve.
  • Identify the problem (design a paper airplane to fly a long distance).
  • Describe how the constraints of time, space, environment and resources will affect the outcome.
  • List the four forces of flight and identify whether they are pushing or pulling forces.
  • Describe how each force will affect the airplane’s motion.
  • Sketch a diagram of a paper airplane designed to travel a long distance.
  • Build a paper airplane according to the diagram.
  • Test the paper airplane’s flight and record the distance traveled. Repeat at least 3 times.
  • Modify the design in an attempt to improve performance.
  • Repeat testing and modifying with remaining time or until satisfied with outcome.

Next Generation Science Standards:

K-PS2-1

K-PS2-2

K-2-ETS1-1

K-2-ETS1-2

K-2-ETS1-3

3-PS2-1

3-PS2-2

3-5-ETS1-1

3-5-ETS1-2

3-5-ETS1-3

 

Common Core Math:

K.MD.A.1

K.MD.A.2

K.GA.1-3

2.MD.A.1

MP.2

MP.5

 

Common Core ELA:

SL.K.5

SL.1.5

 

 

iFLY Virtual Education Program

Paper Airplane Lab (Middle School) Standards Alignment

 

Learning Objectives

Standard

  • Create a paper airplane utilizing the 5-step engineering design process: ask, imagine, plan, create and improve.
  • Identify the problem (design a paper airplane with an accurate flight path).
  • Describe how the constraints of time, space, environment and resources will affect the outcome.
  • List the four forces of flight and identify whether they are pushing or pulling forces.
  • Given a net force scenario, describe the motion of the airplane.
  • Sketch a diagram of a paper airplane designed to travel a long distance.
  • Build a paper airplane according to the diagram.
  • Test the paper airplane’s flight and record the distance from center line or target. Repeat at least 3 times.
  • Modify the design in an attempt to improve performance.
  • Repeat testing and modifying with remaining time or until satisfied with outcome.

Next Generation Science Standards:

MS-PS2-2

MS-PS2-4

MS-ETS1-1

MS-ETS1-2

MS-ETS1-3

MS-ETS1-4

 

Common Core Math:

MP.2

 

Common Core ELA:

RST.6-8.3

 

 

iFLY Virtual Education Program

Paper Airplane Lab (High School) Standards Alignment

 

Learning Objectives

Standard

  • Create a paper airplane utilizing the 5-step engineering design process: ask, imagine, plan, create and improve.
  • Identify the problem (design a paper airplane to stay aloft a long time).
  • Describe how the constraints of time, space, environment and resources will affect the outcome.
  • List the four forces of flight and identify whether they are pushing or pulling forces.
  • Given a net force scenario, describe the motion of the airplane.
  • Propose at least 2 ways to modify how each of the four forces acts on a paper airplane.
  • Sketch a diagram of a paper airplane designed to stay aloft a long time.
  • Build a paper airplane according to the diagram.
  • Test the paper airplane’s flight and record the time from launch until landing. Repeat at least 3 times.
  • Modify the design in an attempt to improve performance.
  • Repeat testing and modifying with remaining time or until satisfied with outcome.

Next Generation Science Standards:

HS-PS2-1

HS-ETS1-2

 

Common Core Math:

MP.2

 

Common Core ELA:

RST.9-10.3

RST.9-10.4

RST.11-12.3

RST.11-12.4

WHST.11-12.7

 

 

iFLY Virtual Education Program

Elementary School Standards Alignment

 

Learning Objectives

Standard

  • Recognize STEM as an acronym and identify what each letter represents.
  • Give examples of STEM careers and how STEM is used to solve real world problems.
  • Define a force as either a push or a pull on an object.
  • Label the forces acting on a skydiver (gravity and air resistance), and determine which direction those forces are acting (pushing or pulling).
  • Tell whether the forces acting on an object are balanced or unbalanced based on the object’s motion.
  • Name the two factors which determine the wind speed needed to make an object hover in the wind tunnel.
  • Observe and describe the behavior of a variety of objects in the wind tunnel. Predict which objects will fly at faster velocities and justify your predictions with evidence.

Next Generation Science Standards:

K-PS2-1

3-PS2-1

 

Common Core Math:

K.MD.A.1

K.MD.A.2

K.MP.2

3.MD.C.5

 

Common Core ELA:

SL.K-5.1-3

 

 

 

iFLY Virtual Education Program

National Middle School Standards Alignment

 

Learning Objectives

Standard

  • List examples of STEM careers and explain how STEM is used in the real world to solve problems.
  • Identify the steps of the engineering design process and tell how it applies to the evolution of indoor wind tunnels.
  • Name and explain the purpose for each of the major components of a wind tunnel.
  • Define speed, velocity and acceleration and explain how each of these terms relates to skydiving.
  • Use a free body diagram to analyze the forces acting on a skydiver.
  • Identify when the gravitational force or the force of air drag is dominant. Discuss the effect this has on a skydiver’s velocity and acceleration.
  • Recognize terminal velocity as the point when forces are balanced (net force = 0) and acceleration is zero.
  • Analyze the variables affecting terminal velocity and identify those which remain constant and those that change from person to person.
  • Define frontal area and explain its’ relationship to terminal velocity.
  • Compare and contrast indoor and outdoor skydiving.
  • Predict, observe, and analyze the velocities of different objects in the wind tunnel.

Next Generation Science Standards:

MS-PS2-2

MS-PS2-4

MS-PS2-5

MS-ETS1-1

 

Common Core Math:

6.EE.A.2

6.EE.B.6

MP.2

 

Common Core ELA:

SL.6.1-3

SL.7.1-3

SL.8.1-3

RST.6-8.4

 

 

iFLY Virtual Education Program

National High School Standards Alignment

 

Learning Objectives

Standard

  • Explore STEM careers, the engineering design process as applied to indoor wind tunnels, and other applications of wind tunnels in STEM.
  • Identify the scientific principles used in the design of an iFly wind tunnel.
  • Use a free body diagram to sum the forces acting on a skydiver.
  • Identify when the gravitational force or the force of air drag is dominant. Discuss the effect this has on a skydiver’s velocity and acceleration.
  • Recognize terminal velocity as the point when forces are balanced (net force = 0) and acceleration is zero.
  • Derive the equation for terminal velocity using the balance of forces equation (sum of forces = ma).
  • Calculate an estimated personal terminal velocity using the derived equation.
  • Use the equation for terminal velocity to conclude what would happen if certain variables were increased or decreased. For example, “How would terminal velocity be affected by skydiving on Mars?”
  • Discuss the difference in frames of reference between the wind tunnel and skydiving, i.e, in the wind tunnel the flyer is still and the air is moving, while in free flight the air is still and the skydiver is moving.
  • Predict, observe, and analyze the velocities of different objects in the wind tunnel.

Next Generation Science Standards:

HS-PS2-1

HS-ETS1-3

 

Common Core Math:

HSA.CED.A.1

HSA.CED.A.2

HSA.CED.A.4

HSN-Q.A.1

HSN-Q.A.3

HSN.RN.A.2

HSA.REI.A.1

HSA.REI.B.3

 

Common Core ELA:

SL.9-10.1

SL.9-10.3

SL.11-12.1

SL.11-12.3

RST.9-10.4

 

 

 

iFLY Virtual Education Program

Paper Airplane Lab Standards Alignment

 

Learning Objectives

Standard

  • Explore STEM careers, the engineering design process as applied to indoor wind tunnels, and other applications of wind tunnels in STEM.
  • Identify the scientific principles used in the design of an iFly wind tunnel.
  • Use a free body diagram to sum the forces acting on a skydiver.
  • Identify when the gravitational force or the force of air drag is dominant. Discuss the effect this has on a skydiver’s velocity and acceleration.
  • Recognize terminal velocity as the point when forces are balanced (net force = 0) and acceleration is zero.
  • Derive the equation for terminal velocity using the balance of forces equation (sum of forces = ma).
  • Calculate an estimated personal terminal velocity using the derived equation.
  • Use the equation for terminal velocity to conclude what would happen if certain variables were increased or decreased. For example, “How would terminal velocity be affected by skydiving on Mars?”
  • Discuss the difference in frames of reference between the wind tunnel and skydiving, i.e, in the wind tunnel the flyer is still and the air is moving, while in free flight the air is still and the skydiver is moving.
  • Predict, observe, and analyze the velocities of different objects in the wind tunnel.

Next Generation Science Standards:

HS-PS2-1

 

Common Core Mathematics:

HSA.CED.A.1

HSA.CED.A.2

HSA.CED.A.4

HSA.REI.A.1

HSA.REI.B.3

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